JAYA
Everybody’s Getting Married

JAYA explores the emotional fatigue associated with millennial angst, namely growing older and trying to make a living doing what you love. 

Transparency is JAYA‘s most vital asset on her solo debut. Everybody’s Getting Married is a crystal-clear glimpse into the inner workings of a songwriter’s mind. Lush synth chords and minimalist drumming perfectly prop up the honest lyrical compositions found within the album. After fronting the Victoria-based Wise Child, Jaya Bremer uses her first solo record to explore the emotional fatigue associated with millennial angst, namely growing older and trying to make a living doing what you love. 

Every track holds a depth of character unique unto itself. With seven tracks that weave between genres with minimal struggle, Everybody’s Getting Married is a love affair of synth-pop and indie-rock. The sonic elegance of the whole project is so rich, it isn’t hard to remain transfixed over its all-too-short runtime.

“Life’s a bitch / Time’s a bit too slow to really do anything of importance” sings Bremer on “Not Gonna Happen.” As she laments how hard work doesn’t necessarily lead to prosperity, looping piano chords further reinforce themes of repetition and litany found all over the album. 

“Cursed”, one of the album’s most powerful songs, displays Bremer at her most vulnerable. On top of haunting electronic drones and a hip-hop-inspired beat, Bremer sings, “I’m so tired of being me / I’m so tired of the city / Nothing changes, Nothing good.” 

While most of Everybody’s Getting Married is deeply rooted in melancholy, most tracks manage to find some resolution if not outright atonement. On the standout song “Learn To Swim,” a wonderfully unapologetic shoegaze track, Bremer sings, “You’ve always been too afraid to get your feet wet, it’s not so bad.” As the water rises and the feeling of drowning becomes increasingly pervasive in everyday life, for Bremer, learning to swim might not solve the problems life throws her way, but it sure as hell can help.

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